Test Tubes and Trains


Railways

Thursday 6 December 2012, 6.30 - 8.30pm
The Chemistry Centre, London W1J 0BA

The railway industry is now one of the most capital-intensive and largest employers in the British economy. It has also been one of the most important agents for social change, from seaside holidays to establishment of countless factories of all kinds, and has made possible a vast increase in the movement of people and goods. From the earliest days chemists have been employed by the railways and chemistry has played a vital role in the industry ever since. 

The extent to which this has always been true is discussed in this lecture. One remarkable fact is the reluctance, until quite recently, of the railway industry to acknowledge the massive contribution of chemistry.  Some explanations are offered for this curious anomaly. The presenters have written a book on the whole subject which will be launched at the lecture. Read a review of the book here.

Authors Colin A. Russell and John Hudson will explain the chemical foundations of the railway industry and the anomaly of the historical reluctance of the railway industry to recognise chemistry‚Äôs vital contribution. 

Suggested hashtag for Twitter users: #RSCpubliclectures

WATCH

 

A VIDEO OF THIS LECTURE WILL SOON BE AVAILABLE ON THIS PAGE 

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